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Vascular Conditions We Treat

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Peripheral Vascular Disease and Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease 

Peripheral vascular disease, or PVD, develops when veins or arteries to your arms, stomach or kidneys become clogged with plaque, limiting blood flow. PVD puts you at risk for having a heart attack or stroke, as well as for deep vein thrombosis. Deep vein thrombosis is a clot that occurs in a deep vein, and has the potential to dislodge and travel to the lungs. This is a life-threatening event.

Similarly, peripheral arterial occlusive disease, or PAD, develops when the arteries in the legs become clogged with plaque, limiting blood flow. Loss of circulation in the leg can cause ulcers, gangrene and require amputation.

Symptoms for PVD and PAD can often be confused with other conditions. Symptoms can include swelling and tenderness, raised veins, cold fingers or toes, muscle numbness, cramping, pain or tiredness in the leg that goes away with rest, as well as toe or foot sores that do not heal.

Treatment for PVD and PAD often includes lifestyle changes and a combination of therapies such as:

  • Medication to improve blood flow or to treat high blood pressure or high cholesterol.
  • Surgery to veins or arteries to remove a blockage, widen the blood vessel or placement of a mesh tube called a stent to keep your vessel open. Sometimes bypass surgery is recommended to reroute blood flow around a blockage.

Aortic Aneurysm 

An aortic aneurysm is a bulge in the aorta, your body's largest artery that carries oxygen-rich blood from your heart to all parts of your body. This bulge can rupture and cause life-threatening bleeding.

An aortic aneurysm can be slow to grow and exhibit no symptoms. That's why regular checkups are important. When the aneurysm enlarges, some symptoms can include chest, belly or back pain; a pulsing sensation in the abdomen; a cold foot or black and blue, painful toe; cough; or shortness of breath.

Treatment for an aortic aneurysm depends on its size, location and your overall health. Treatment can include:

  • Medication to slow the growth of the aneurysm and regular testing to keep a watchful eye on its progress.
  • Surgery for larger, fast-growing or leaking aneurysms. You may be recommended for traditional open-abdominal surgery or a less invasive procedure called endovascular surgery.

Carotid Disease 

Carotid artery disease happens when the arteries that deliver blood to your brain and head become narrowed or blocked by plaque. This condition puts you at risk for having a stroke, a permanent loss of brain function. Stroke is the third-leading cause of death in the United States.

Carotid artery disease is slow and progressive and there are often no symptoms until a stroke happens.

Treatment for carotid artery disease often includes lifestyle changes and a combination of therapies such as:

  • Medication to lower blood pressure, reduce cholesterol and/or prevent blood clots from forming in your carotid arteries.
  • Surgery to remove the plaque in your carotidartery, widen your artery that has a blockage and/or placement of a mesh tube called a stent to keep your artery open.

Vascular disease often has no symptoms. Regular checkups are an important way to catch vascular disease early enough for treatment.

Limb Salvage and Wound Care 

When vascular disease decreases blood flow to the legs and feet, non-healing wounds or ulcers may result and sometimes amputation is necessary. To restore circulation and preserve a patient's legs, feet and toes, specialized wound treatment and revascularization procedures can be performed, including:

  • Medication to heal skin conditions, thin the blood and help with circulation.
  • Hyperbaric oxygen therapy to speed wound healing.
  • Surgery to remove a blockage in your vein,widen a vein that has narrowed and/or placement of a mesh tube called a stent to keep your vein open. Sometimes bypass surgery is recommended to reroute blood flow around a blockage.

Vein Conditions 

Venous conditions happen when the valves in veins do not function well or a clot blocks blood flow and interferes with circulation. This condition can result in varicose veins, phlebitis, blood clots and skin ulcers. Venous conditions can be caused by injury, excess weight or standing or sitting for long periods of time.

Symptoms can include swelling, visible veins, heaviness or cramping in the legs, skin color changes, infections or ulcers.

Treatment for venous conditions often includes lifestyle changes and a combination of therapies such as:

  • Compression therapy to improve blood flow.
  • Medication to heal skin conditions, thin the blood and help with circulation.
  • Sclerotherapy to inject a chemical into small or medium damaged veins so that they can no longer carry blood (blood will return to the heart through other veins).
  • Surgery to remove a blockage in your vein, widen a vein that has narrowed and/or placement of a mesh tube called a stent to keep your vein open. Sometimes bypass surgery is recommended to reroute blood flow around a blockage.
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